Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Middlemarch Review Part II

Now for the more ambiguous characters. Read part one here and three here.
  The Vincys, Sir James and Celia, yawn.

Mr. and Mrs. Cadwallader—funny.

I despised and disliked Dorothea herself in the beginning; she was stupid and obnoxious and inconsistent, aiming for “high” goals with steps that quite clearly took her to depths as she had neither foresight or insight. She was described as being deep and noble and etc., but her actions showed otherwise until after Causabon’s death. Actions speak louder than words even in fiction.

She should’ve seen that even a  great theological work (which Causabon’s work was NOT) is not widely beneficial—God does not list massive theological works under Christian responsibilities (although they are and do good to educated people), but He does require kindness, charity, and good works—and her cottages were much more Biblical and helpful especially in light of the fact that Causabon’s work turned out to be mythological and ludicrous.

She rather deserved a downfall, but I think she perhaps got more that she deserved…maybe not, she should’ve know marriage was for life and could be bondage.

Even though she was innocent, I still think she should’ve known better than to be so free and friendly with Will, especially since she knew that it displeased her husband.

I am glad Causabon died before she could promise—but she still showed her weakness. She seemed very mature after that ordeal though, I like the concept of progression. I wish Will had shown it too though. I did like her and Will’s relationship after the death of Causabon.

Will, oh Will. “What a pepper-pots you are!” (guess that quote!) Will, who doesn't love a Will? And Ladislaw, are all Polish names interesting? He is interesting and merry and ardent and changeable.

He was irritating in his worship of Dorothea and the way he viewed all other women—except when this was applied to Rosamund—that wretch. He spent too much time with Rosamund, and he should’ve known better and seen how shallow she was.  Even if he cared so little what other people thought of it and for Rosamund herself, he still should’ve cared what Dorothea thought…and his duty to Lydgate.

He was also committing adultery with Dorothea on his own part. But as I said, I loved that he and Dorothea married after that…is that wrong? His honor and pride were impeccable with regards to everything besides marriage in which he deceived himself.

Farebrother. I liked him at first probably somewhat to make up for Lydgate’s snubs. When Mary came up, I was much less pleased with him. The age difference was disgusting. I also took offense at the comparison between himself and Fred as if he had some greater right because he was older…to a young woman near Fred’s age. If he and Fred were the same age and Mary was neutral, yes, but the older shouldn’t steal from the younger nor should the unfavoured from the first favoured.

It was interesting that he was so truthful with Fred, but it was disgusting to hear of such selfish, deceitful considerations from so old a person and a clergyman. He shouldn’t have pushed his case as angered at Fred’s presumption against his worthy age—he would’ve lost his respect had he put in his hand. He took the only honourable course even had Mary been neutral.

Mrs. Garth. The fact of her being above Caleb in status shouldn’t have affected Caleb’s deserving an excellent woman. She may have been described as a good woman, but I don’t want the author to tell me if a character is good or bad or nice or mean—I want to see those things. I did not see anything overly admirable and certainly nothing pleasant about Mrs. Garth.

Mary was a nice character of course, but she was rather underdeveloped as a character especially since she was pursued by two male characters at least one of whom was more developed than herself. There was very little interaction between her admirers and herself.

The quote is from Little Women in chapter 21. Jo says it to Laurie, of course!


No comments :

Post a Comment

Hello, I love comments. Please be sweet and well-bred! I reserve the right to delete comments that make me uncomfortable.