Wednesday, November 2, 2016

A Celebration of Classic Hollywood Week: Film Review of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

I'm linking up at An Old-Fashioned Girl for A Celebration of Classic Hollywood Week. Since I seem to be either criticizing or incoherently fangirling or only noting a few details when I write about movies, I thought I'd better look up some more formal guidelines for movie reviewing. I found two printouts from the Thompson Writing Program at Duke University (this and this). I just used the first handout and very generally, but I found it helpful.

My sister and I watched Seven Brides for Seven Brothers at a sleep-over with friends as young preteens or teens. I felt a bit shocked at what I then considered its coarseness ("Bless Your Beautiful Hide . . ."). You have no idea, little me. I don't think I warmed up considerably as the film progressed either. But later, after hearing others mention it, I tried it again, and then even later watched it with my mom and sisters. I own it now, and we love it.

Anyway, this 1954 musical features Jane Powell and Howard Keel (I've watched him in Annie Get Your Gun recently, and he looks SO different without a mustache) as well as several Broadway dancers and singers and an actress who later played Lois Lane in one of the Superman films (this we discovered after watching it with extended family and an aunt recognized the actress; I love how movies can be such an interactive experience). The film's main plot revolves around the unconventional (what an understatement!) wooing of "seven slumachy back woodsmen" e.g. the Pontipee brothers in frontier era Oregon Territory. The brothers of course run into conflict with the proper townsmen, but eventually all the (wild, sometimes lawbreaking) boys marry their (incredibly fickle) girls.

This movie is so silly, fun, and hilarious. Several of the songs are quite humorous and others are quite sentimental (these are NOT our favorites; we skip some out of boredom). Because Adam marries first, his wife Millie takes on the first part of civilizing the brothers, with considerably mixed results! The boys' own ladies complete the polishing work. Millie, Gideon, and Hannah teach Adam his own separate lesson. I love the hilarity of course, but I also like the sweet familial and romantic scenes mixed in all the drama and fun.

As is typical of old musicals, this film is short and the story is simple. Only a few of the brothers and only one of the wives show any great characterization. The film focuses on singing, (melo) drama, and humor. It is a light, short, fun film for when you aren't in the mood for intensity of any type.

4 comments :

  1. I love this musical! Such a fun retelling of the Snow White story. Have you seen "Showboat"? Howard Keel is quite handsome in that too.

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    1. Haha, I didn't even think of it as the Snow White story . . . way more interesting version of it I must. No, I haven't seen "Showboat." I will have to look it up.

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  2. This is one of my favourite musicals!!
    I love the songs and the movie is just so funny and doesn't really take itself too seriously;)
    It's great when you suddenly notice new things about movies - such as the actor playing Gideon is also in West Side Story and that suddenly explained why I for some reason liked that character;)

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    1. I haven't seen Westside Story, that is interesting. Yeah, I know the movie is so awesomely goofy.

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