Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Books I Read and Movies I Watched in July

Let's just say this was an embarrassing month. I read a whopping 2 books and watched and re-watched a TON of Hallmark.

Books
So I read two books . . . but only one new one. I did read on plenty of other books that I will be finishing up in August (but that I easily could have finished in July, ahem).

Reread
A Tangled Web
Since I was not super motivated with my main stack of books, I decided to read something I wanted to read. I've since increased my lighter and fun reading pile. I usually have plenty of fun novels, but they are usually shorter, and I read them first, plus this time I didn't finish at least two.

Anyway, I had forgotten some of this, and I love all the details. I laughed out loud at parts. I went back and re-read parts again after I had finished re-reading.

New Read
Cheaper by the Dozen
Dad started reading this to us when we were small; he may have finished it, but what I found most memorable were the times he stopped because of not age appropriate issues. Definitely adult areas, but written in a way a child wouldn't understand, I think. I was surprised at this for the time period though.

Movies
At some point, I might start writing down all my re-watches because I need to limit my movie viewing. I don't want to watch movies at the same pace or higher than I read whether they be new or not. I'm not sure if I've listed everything, but this is bad good enough. I don't have much to say. We, of course, enjoyed the Thin Man mystery, and some of the Hallmarks (the last two listed) were dumb/boring, some were cute and funny (the first two listed) and one had a really funny guy but the rest was blah.

Classics
Shadow of the Thin Man

Rewatches
Hallmarks
How to Steal a Million
Roman Holiday

Hallmark
Surprised by Love
Appetite For Love
Moonlight in Vermont
Autumn in the Vineyard
Chance At Romance



Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Fairy Stories

Today's Top Ten Tuesday is a freebie (here is the list on The Broke and the Bookish). 

Mine is fairy stories, not really fairy-tales, but rather stories that feature the fairy realm. And this is eleven and all that I've read in this category.

~Fairies of the Celtic Lands by Nigel Suckling. This is a book about what is essentially Celtic mythology which is what fairies are. And this is the original dark stuff, not the cute, fun pixies and sparkles and Disney. You can see how Tolkien formed his fictional universe. This is essential to understand better the British based novels below (only Wildwood Dancing is not British)

~Faery Rebels (Knife/Spell-Hunter, Rebel/Wayfarer, and Arrow). Set in Britain and based on Celtic/British mythology. Absolutely riveting.

~Swift and Nomad. These follow the above three chronologically in the same fictional universe (and with some of the same characters) but are part of their own series. The author planned a third but to our sorrow, that hasn't worked out yet. These are my favorite.

~Wildwood Dancing. I love this. Set in Transylvania with a hint of the twelve dancing princesses fairy tale (my favorite) and touches of vampire legends, just enough to spook but not enough to terrify. I didn't enjoy Cybele's Secret as well.

~13 Treasures, 13 Curses, and 13 Secrets. These are technically middle grade, but be warned, they are dark (more like the actual tales), and the last is far too gruesome for that age (and for me in parts)




Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Art Fair Haul

My grandparents and I made our fourth annual trip to a local art fair again. I went once before without them and then after I invited them once we've made it a tradition. I love it. My attention span matches with their strength and the area is a nice, small size.


This lovely tray is made out of recycled aluminum; its as elegant looking as pewter but lighter and less expensive. The lady said is was safer for food use too, but I know other people disagree with use of aluminum with food. 


I love these little houses. I bought different sizes and colors for my sister, and I'd love to have a more full collection. They are adorable alone but can also be used for vases and planters.

I also bought natural bug spray and poison ivy treatment spray. The latter contains jewelweed. I'd read about that before when searching for poison ivy helps (I seem to get it every year, probably from the animals although I haven't got it yet). The lady who made these sprays says jewelweed grows by poison ivy which I thought was fascinating.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Books as Cake Tag

I'm still trying to tie up things for my new blog, and because I'm still learning how to prepare and not wing everything, this is taking much longer than I expected because I'm constantly finding out new things. So, here is another tag.

I've seen a few versions of this tag, but I don't like some of the cakes/haven't had some and didn't think all the choices fit, so I scrambled them up from the sources and then scrambled the tag up and also added my own cakes and categories.

Dark Chocolate Cake: a Dark Book You Enjoyed
All the Light You Cannot See. This is possibly the darkest book that I've read and enjoyed, but I'm not sure I'd read it again. I know too much about WWII (and yet hardly a drop), and I kept adding to what the writer said in my head.

Chocolate Cake: a Book You'd Recommend to Everyone
That would have to be non-fiction, sorry, I don't think people have the same fiction tastes. Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America by David Hackett Fischer. An amazing history of the colonization of the United States that explains SO much of our history and culture. Oh, I'm sorry is does that sound like a vegetable book to you? Well, it shouldn't. I found it quite readable for a scholarly work and absolutely fascinating in content and organization.

Angel Food Cake: a Light Read (because vanilla cake ISN'T light people)
The Ordinary Princess by M. M. Kaye. Princess and fairytale stories are my go-to light reading category.

Vanilla Cake: a Romance
I'm going to put something different from Blue Castle although that is good, everyone seems to be talking about it so instead I will choose The Harvester by Gene Stratton-Porter.

Red Velvet Cake: a Favorite Mystery
Whose Body by Dorothy Sayers. What caught me and held me to the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. There are few boring ones, but the ones with him and Harriet Vane!

Cheesecake (cause I'm not a cheesecake fan): a Book You Didn't Finish
So many, I don't remember them all. I didn't think them worth finishing after all. The most recent unfinished book was the first of Andrew Peterson's Wingfeather saga. I did appreciate his humorous references to popular fantasy novels and the ridiculous amount he sculled from them. However, that is not enough for a story. His characters were awful and the story slow. And the scatological humor and other gross 6-year old boy descriptions made me want to gag regularly; this was SO unnecessary and beyond distracting. I ended up skimming and sending back to the library.

I don't feel compelled to finish books. I dislike the check box mentality. To-dos are for accomplishing worthy activities, not simply to complete something. Don't waste your time merely to complete something. and there are too many good books in the world and too many good things in the world to waste time on bad and mediocre books.

Carrot Cake: a Book You Had Mixed Feelings About (I'm not sure I really HAVE mixed feelings about books, I'm a bit take it or leave it)
I'm going to go with Jacob Have I Loved. I loved the writing, but the story has some content issues, and I didn't find the ending (and the ending writing quality) satisfying.

Pound Cake: a Book with Great Writing (because the best poundcake has perfect texture)
So many books have great writing. That is a HUGE reason why I like them. And I like reading whole spades of books from authors whose writing I liked. No, wait. I've found one. The Book Thief. I loved the writing for that, but when I tried another of his books, his writing style didn't translate well for that story, it felt overwrought, absurd, and out of place.

Ice Cream Cake: a Book with All the Layers and Details
I'm going to go with a recent re-read, A Tangled Web. So much going on here. So many lovely details that you forget and love to find again when re-reading.

A Teeny Tiny Petit Four (since every other cake fills you quite up): A Book that Left You Wanting More
Okay, I'm going to be lazy and pick an unfinished work: Sandition. Oh, it looks to be one of her best novels and best heroes! There are so many books that leave me wanting more to various degrees. More about continued generations, more about the characters' lives later, more details.

Cupcakes: a Favorite  4+ Book Series
I'm cheating, sort of. My sisters and I consider R. J. Anderson's Faery Rebel trilogy Knife (Spell-hunter in U.S.), Rebel (Wayfarer in U.S.), and Arrow the beginning part of a series with the duology (Swift and Nomad) following because of the same universe and characters and the chronology. I think only the first two are available in U.S., but I ordered them all from Amazon U.K. so all the covers would match together.

Fruitcake: a Book that Was Not What You Expected
Dr. Strange and Mr. Norrell. I expected more of a usual style of fantasy, but this was almost like Dickens plus magicians. Odd too in other ways.

Strawberry Cake: Your Favorite American Novel
I haven't read many U.S. classics and don't like what I've read. I prefer children's classics, and I will go with A Bridge to Terebithia. I love Katherine Patterson's writing.